UCDSVP win €5000 Better Ireland prize

 
 

UCD’s branch of the St Vincent de Paul have claimed the €5,000 first prize in the AIB Better Ireland Awards. UCDSVP auditor Kevin Conlon has said that the prize came at the right time for the group, and will be distributed among their youth initiatives.

The AIB Better Ireland Programme is run with the purpose of promoting and supporting local children’s projects throughout the country. Each of AIB’s 182 main branches were each given €10,000 to disperse among the causes deemed to be most worthy in their community. The winners were determined by a public vote that was conducted online and by text among the members of the community. UCDSVP run six local youth projects that comprise of three youth clubs, two homework clubs and a small group that organises parties for local children. The prize money will be split between these groups.

Conlon credited UCDSVP members, saying that the success of the organisation during the recession has been “purely down to the volunteers,” who have kept the club running.

The Grove After-School Care Management Company came second in the competition earning a prize of €3,000 and the SU’s Access Week programme finishing third, winning €2,000.

SU Welfare Vice-President, Scott Ahearn, expressed his delight at the success in securing this funding, describing the Access Week programme was “a great initiative.” The Access Week programme involves bringing primary school children from disadvantaged areas and backgrounds to UCD for a day. During this day they will be given a tour of the campus and are allowed to participate in various activities designed to encourage them to see third level education as a realistic option for them to pursue later in their lives.

Ahearn stated that the goal of the Access Week programme was to stress “how college is important” but also to “show them [that] UCD’s cool. They get to go to the science labs and they get to go to the museum in the Classical department.”

Ahearn explained that the funding will be spent on the supplies used over the course of the week, such as the chemical equipment used in the demonstrations carried out in the labs for the children. He commented that the money will be helpful in making the day more enjoyable for the participating children, adding that the prize money would be spent on “t-shirts for the kids and little hats.”

UCD’s branch of the St Vincent de Paul have claimed the €5,000 first prize in the AIB Better Ireland Awards. UCDSVP auditor Kevin Conlon has said that the prize came at the right time for the group, and will be distributed among their youth initiatives.

The AIB Better Ireland Programme is run with the purpose of promoting and supporting local children’s projects throughout the country. Each of AIB’s 182 main branches were each given €10,000 to disperse among the causes deemed to be most worthy in their community. The winners were determined by a public vote that was conducted online and by text among the members of the community. UCDSVP run six local youth projects that comprise of three youth clubs, two homework clubs and a small group that organises parties for local children. The prize money will be split between these groups.

Conlon credited UCDSVP members, saying that the success of the organisation during the recession has been “purely down to the volunteers,” who have kept the club running.

The Grove After-School Care Management Company came second in the competition earning a prize of €3,000 and the SU’s Access Week programme finishing third, winning €2,000.

SU Welfare Vice-President, Scott Ahearn, expressed his delight at the success in securing this funding, describing the Access Week programme was “a great initiative.” The Access Week programme involves bringing primary school children from disadvantaged areas and backgrounds to UCD for a day. During this day they will be given a tour of the campus and are allowed to participate in various activities designed to encourage them to see third level education as a realistic option for them to pursue later in their lives.

Ahearn stated that the goal of the Access Week programme was to stress “how college is important” but also to “show them [that] UCD’s cool. They get to go to the science labs and they get to go to the museum in the Classical department.”

Ahearn explained that the funding will be spent on the supplies used over the course of the week, such as the chemical equipment used in the demonstrations carried out in the labs for the children. He commented that the money will be helpful in making the day more enjoyable for the participating children, adding that the prize money would be spent on “t-shirts for the kids and little hats.”

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