iPhone 8: Here for a Good Time, Not a Long Time

 
 

Priscilla Obilana investigates the faults of the newest iPhone and evaluates the continued patience of iPhone users.

 

Apple’s advertising is without fault even if their products are full of them. The release of the iPhone 8 on September 22nd of this year saw a mass exodus of users taking to social media with numerous complaints centred around one primary subject area, the charging of the phone.

 

Various issues surrounding this specific area are much like the iPhone releases of the past, in that there are way too many.

Reviews showed that despite those loud critiques, sales were not affected.

Not too long ago, following the announcement of the last iPhone 7, common criticism surfaced surrounding the controversial decision that Apple made to remove the headphone jack, on any and all future devices. However, reviews showed that despite those loud critiques, sales were not affected.

 

Now with the subsequent release of the iPhone 8, although sales reportedly did not reach Apple’s anticipated forecasts, the mobile remained a definite success for the company. Despite this, Apple consumers have, once again, taken to the internet to voice their frustrations with the latest device, speaking on a problem affectionately referred to as “Charge Gate.”

 

The most prominent issue, according to users, is that the battery life on the phone is practically non-existent. Users report a significant decrease in the competency of the battery, complaining that it is not long-lasting.

 

Also, many have stated that even charging the phone takes too long. Furthermore, even for iPhone holders who have not purchased an iPhone 8, updates from iOS 11 through to the most recent 11.0.3, which were criticised for being rushed, have been continuously forced on them, crippling the battery life on older models too.

Whilst charging, the iPhone 8 has the minute tendency to physically crack from its casing.

 

Another major issue which users have complained about is they have lost the ability to simultaneously charge their phones and listen to music as the charging port is the only place where you can still connect earphones. A significant problem which affects a more substantial number of people than may be first thought.

 

On top of all these problems, one hardware breaking disaster has surfaced in at least two phones. Whilst charging, the iPhone 8 has the minute tendency to physically crack from its casing. Although this affects a terribly infinitesimal proportion of shipped phones, Apple are nevertheless looking into the matter.

 

The question remains, how does Apple, with its extensive resources, not foresee the extent of problems that their products will pose to consumers or act according to rectify them in the next phone?

 

Alternatively, is it that they do realise this issue, but know they have too loyal a demographic for it to negatively affect them? Apple’s iPhone sales revenue alone should qualify as a hefty budget to pivot future designs to satisfy customers.  So, what is ultimately to be blamed for the faults found in Apple technology?

 

Considering that it has only been ten years since the first iPhone’s release, it is worth considering that perhaps they do not allow themselves enough time to thoroughly create a sound product before they force out a new version. Even now, the iPhone X is available for pre-order and is expected to start shipping on the 3rd of November, a mere four weeks since the latest release.

 

A point of contention surrounding Apple is their rush of products and updates to the market, resulting in a subpar outcome, sacrificing quality control for quick turnover. Their aim is not to provide iPhones for longevity but instead for frivolous moment after frivolous moment.

 

The iPhone 8 was announced at the same time as the iPhone X; it was never meant to be a robust solid phone that would last for years, as it was being replaced in little over a month anyway. It was here for a good time, not a long time.

 

Apple’s advertising is without fault even if their products are full of them and this may also be part of their success.

 

It is important to note though, that despite Apple gaining so much bad press due to the abundance of faults in their devices, they manage to remain market leaders and continue to charge premium prices for, according to reviews, exceptionally faulty devices. Why do people keep purchasing iPhones?

 

Apple’s advertising is without fault even if their products are full of them and this may also be part of their success. Before the hype of the latest iPhone dies down, with its new colour options, applications, and emojis, there’s another one to build off of the former’s buzz. They do not give consumers the opportunity to become accustomed to their current devices.

 

It is a tried and tested formula, and they cannot be faulted for continuing in the similitude, but hey, what do I know? I’m an android user.

 

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